SWIR

SWIR is a high-speed short-wave infrared hyperspectral camera that operates in the 1000–2500 nm range. It has 384 spatial pixels and achieves image rates of up to 400 frames per second using a CameraLink connection.

To assure indoor/outdoor usage in varying conditions, it now has rugged weather-proof IP54 casing and temperature-stabilized optics but still uses less power than before, only 50W nominal.

Its temperature-stabilized optics provide stability and sensitivity required in the most challenging near-infrared chemical imaging applications, from pharmaceutical quality assurance to food and agriculture analysis. The SWIR camera meets the highest requirements in the lab, industry, and field.

MAIN FEATURES AND BENEFITS

384 spatial pixels

Up to 400 frames per second

Rugged weather-proof IP54 casing

Temperature-stabilized optics

SWIR CAMERAS ARE BEST SUITED FOR:

CHEMICAL AND MATERIAL SORTING

PHARMACEUTICAL MANUFACTURE

RECYCLING

MINERAL MAPPING

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

MOISTURE CONTENT DISTRIBUTION

ART RESEARCH AND ARCHIVING

FORENSICS

RELATED CONTENT

Webinar: Discover the power of SWIR hyperspectral imaging

Detection of adhesives with Specim hyperspectral cameras

Detecting oil on metal and fabric with Specim hyperspectral cameras

Hyperspectral imaging in agriculture and vegetation

Hyperspectral imaging for environmental monitoring

Hyperspectral imaging in pharmaceutics

Hyperspectral imaging in pharmaceutics and medical

Hyperspectral imaging for mining and oil industries

Hyperspectral imaging for oil and mineral exploration

Hyperspectral imaging in food quality and safety

Hyperspectral imaging in food quality and safety

Hyperspectral imaging in recycling

Hyperspectral imaging in recycling and waste management

Plastics sorting with Specim FX cameras article hero image of plastic bottles.

Plastics sorting with Specim FX hyperspectral cameras

Hyperspectral imaging in art and archaeology

Food quality inspection with hyperspectral imaging.

Food quality and composition analysis with hyperspectral imaging

Behind The Scenes: Scanning work of art